Gulls

What do you know about

the mechanisms of despondence?

 

Bury the moving parts

under black top soil and oak wood chips-

you’ve got to make it look presentable

so

the people passing by only note,

with smiling lips that are already

wrapping around the phrases to follow,

 

“What a clever irrigation system!

 

Yes, such intelligent design,”

 

between sips from paper latte cups

with black or white plastic lids.

 

They may let the toe of their

shined up Mary Janes tap

your circular face

(always pointing to the sky)

and catch a few drops

from your slow leaking hoses

 

which will never stop watering the sod

so long as the city water main remains,

Amen.

 

Do you know the damp of earth at twilight?

The way the dew springs cold

as a tear on the cheeks

of all the leaves at dawn?

 

What can you tell me about the salty sting

of an unexpected mist in your airway,

like walking the beach in December-

 

bundled up head to foot and still

cursing the wind?

 

What are the inner workings of a roiling

thunderhead that brings with it

the rising sun,

the stink of dust,

the bane of rust?

 

Does it resemble a northwest ocean

in the sky

with no sign of the shore for miles?

Only grey,

only heavy all around.

 

Seagulls know-

with their voided eyes

as sharp as their bloody beaks,

they’re as hungry as they are hollow,

with salt from the sea in the cage of their ribs.

 

From sullied white feathers

to sand riddled feet,

each part of them was formed

to be born and to die in the ever changing wet-

that’s why they make that sound.

3 thoughts on “Gulls

  1. Hi K.,

    This is more indication to me of the growing war by the machines against humans. The original Terminator was on the money and soon we will be in the soup. I need to study the poem a bit longer, although “that’s why they make that sound,'” is pretty awesome. Thanks. Duke

    Liked by 1 person

  2. The contrast between being constantly wet and yet insatiably dry really sums up despondence as does “catching a few drops from your slow dripping hoses.” And who ever called the seagull a cheerful bird? Love it.

    Liked by 1 person

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